A Woman’s Life by Stonehouse

By Stonehouse, the artist

I just wanted to share this beautiful “live” drawing as a reminder to see past what we think we know about the women around us.

My sister-in-law, Dawn, recently shared these words from a Twila Paris song, “Same Girl,” in the comments at this blog, a post about my mom, who is dealing with Alzheimer’s Disease.

“Picture with me if you can, a little girl in a younger land, running, playing, laughing, growing stronger. But now her aged limbs have failed and her rosy cheeks have paled. Look beyond the lines ’til you remember. She’s still the same girl running down the hill, she’s still the same girl, memories vivid still. Listen to her story and her eyes will glow. She’s still the same girl, and we need her so…”

My mom on the right.
My mom on the right. 1942?

“Listen to her story and her eyes will glow…”  This is true of every woman, from the little girl so small she can barely express in words, to a young woman falling n love for the first time, to a harried wife and mother who is living to serve and run. It is true as the children leave the nest and the gray hair emerges. It is truer than true as age and aches and pains become the norm, And it is true for even the woman who is struggling to maintain some sense of who she is while suffering dementia.

{{Listen to her story: from my youngest granddaughter and the bigger ones, too, to my lovely daughters, to my sister and the sweetest sister-in-laws I have been blessed with to my cherished mamala, and all the dearest of friends and godly women who have invested in me and younger women who so kindly allow me access to their hearts...}}

My mom on the right.
My mom on the right. 1940?

If some one, anyone, will just listen, we have a story to tell. We know some things, in spite of anything we’ve forgotten or how old-fashioned and outdated we may seem to have become. Because where you are, we once were, too.

My mom on the left. School days. She might be 8 or 9 in this photo.
My mom on the left. School days. She might be 8 or 9 in this photo.

And to tell you, too, that even as Alzheimer’s robs my mom of more and more of her abilities, her confidence and cognitive skills, what we are seeing is, miracle of miracles, Norma Jean :: the little girl who loves all the pretty things and all the people and has the simplest faith – she re-emerges, she is herself, true and pure. “She’s still the same girl, and we need her so!”

Me, my mom, and my little sister :: out on the town
Me, my mom, and my little sister :: out on the town, Avon, IN. Oct. 2015

 

Everyone with a brain is at risk for Alzheimer’s.” – www.alz.org

See more things I have written about this Alzheimer’s journey here

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